Three Charged with Gruesome Murder of Houston Transgender Teen Ally Steinfeld

By Sabrina Samone

&

TMP iReporter Grace Ann Ashcraft

Three people are accused of murdering a Houston, Mo teenager who was recently reported missing.


Online court records indicate 18-year-old Andrew Vrba and 18-year-old Isis Schauer of Houston, and 24-year-old Briana Calderas of Cabool, were charged Thursday with first degree murder and abandonment of a corpse. Vrba also faces charges of armed criminal action.

The three suspects are accused of killing 17-year-old Ally Steinfeld of Houston, who has been dead named as Joseph Steinfeld in recent local news reports.

The Houston Herald reports that burned remains were later identified as Steinfeld’s, who had been reported missing the week prior. The remains were discovered by the Texas County Sheriff’s Office at Calderas’ mobile home near Cabool. Vrba reportedly told authorities that he stabbed Steinfield in the living room of the mobile home, and that all three, Schauer, Calderas, and Vrba wrapped up the victim’s body, took it outside, and destroyed the body by burning it. According to a probable cause statement, the women traveled to Walmart in Houston and Mountain Grove to buy items to aid in the burning of the body.


Steinfeld’s cell phone and a knife were recovered at the property, and stains believed to be blood were located inside the home.

Online court records did not indicate any future hearing dates for the three suspects, and no attorneys were listed.

The investigation is ongoing. Officers remained on the scene Friday.

It was quoted as being, “a grisly terrible series of heinous acts by the accused“, said Texas County Prosecutor Parke Stevens Jr.

Vrba told law enforcement officers that some of the bones were placed in a garbage bag, which was transferred to a chicken coop on the property. Officers executed a search warrant and also found human bones in a burn pile next to the residence. Apparent blood stains were discovered on the living room carpet. Caldereas admitted that the death occurred there, but denied that she wanted the teen, whose preferred name was Ally Steinfeld, according to a social media posting, to die. A cellular telephone belonging to Steinfeld and a knife were recovered at the property.

Facebook messages between the women gave officers a break in the teen’s death, which apparently occurred Sept. 3, six days before Steinfeld’s Birthday.

The women told officers that Vrba bragged about the murder and it’s brutality, according to court documents.

Condolences are pouring onto Ally Steinfeld’s Facebook page, where her last post before being reported missing was on August the 27th, where she wrote, “I feeling little bit beautiful how likes my hair i got it red.”

 

Please follow and like us:
0

A Judge in Brazil Approves ‘Gay Conversion Therapy’

By Sabrina Samone

&

TMP Brazil iReporter Sammy Sarvaris

Yearly, on November 20th, trans people across the globe gather to read the names of fallen sisters and brothers. We honor their lives by speaking their names, and refusing to let the world forget the transphobic hate that took their lives. The names are from all walks of life, and nearly every country, but trans women of color and particularly those in Brazil leaves our community gasping at the number and degree of violence trans people face in Brazil.

According to Gay Group Bahia¹, over 275 lgbt persons have been murdered in one year in Brazil. The stats shows that over 200 gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender people have been murdered between January 1 and September this year. The group’s study, which estimated the number using police records and news reports in the region, found that 43 percent of the times took place in the North East. 35% of victims were trans people, while 59% of those were gay, and 4% were lesbians. Though homosexuality is not a crime in Brazil, it is notorious for having one of the highest murder rates for LGBT people – and transgender people in particular – in the world

Each year, and in particularly on Transgender Day of Remembrance², we listen to the growing names of transgender people being murdered in Brazil. It is this very reason, with the growing murder rate, the latest action of a judge in Brazil has become exceptionally troubling. In a country already beyond an epidemic of homophobia and transphobia, a judge has approved conversion therapy of gay people.

Actions like these give a license for even swifter, uglier forms of hate, and considering this is Brazil, that is beyond alarming.

Waldemar de Carvalho, a federal judge in the capital of Brasília, overruled a 1999 decision by the Federal Council of Psychology that forbade psychologists from offering widely discredited treatments which claims to “cure” gay people.

Coming a week after a bank cancelled an exhibition of gay art after protests from rightwing and evangelical Christian groups, the ruling has raised fears that progressive policies could be overturned.

Brazil has a growing population of evangelical Christians who have protested vociferously at plotlines in television soap operas featuring gay or transgender characters, and increasingly ally themselves with burgeoning rightwing groups.

This decision is a big regression to the progressive conquests that the LBGT community had in recent decades,” David Miranda, a leftist councillor in Rio de Janeiro and one of the country’s few openly gay politicians, told the Guardian. “Like various countries in the world, Brazil is suffering a conservative wave.”

Ivete Sangolo, one of Brazil’s most celebrated singers, wrote:

“The sick ones are those who believe in this grand absurdity,”in an Instagram post commenting on the ruling.

Judge de Carvalho ruled in favor of an action brought by Rozangela Justino, an evangelical Christian and psychologist whose license was revoked in 2016 after she offered “conversion therapy”.

In a 2009 interview with the Folha de S Paulo newspaper, Justino said she saw homosexuality as a “disease”, advised patients to seek religious guidance and said: “I feel directed by God to help people who are homosexual.”

The Federal Council of Psychology said in a statement that the decision “opens the dangerous possibility of the use of sexual reversion therapies” and promised to contest it legally.

Council president Rogério Giannini, a psychologist based in São Paulo, said its 1999 decision prohibiting “sexual conversion” therapy had already faced off other legal actions and even a proposed bill in Congress.

“We have no power over research,” Giannini said in a Guardian interview. “The way it was put by the judge gave the impression that we prohibited research which is not true.”

As hashtags like #curagay (“gay cure”)³ trended in Brazil, Twitter users used memes and GIFs to ridicule the decision.

“They tried to make me go to rehab, I said no, no, no,” tweeted one Brazilian using the name Ubiratan.

Blasphemy is using the word of God to justify one’s hate or own personal sins. Those actions have consequences, and unfortunately our trans sisters and brothers who are often the easiest known targets of LGBT hate may face a heavier toll than we could ever imagine if such legislation continues to go unnoticed and rivaled by the world’s LGBT communities.


  1. Groupo Gay Da Bahia, LGBT rights organization in Brazil similar to the HRC in America.
  2. TDOR (Transgender Day of Remembrance) was set aside to memorialize those who were killed due to anti-transgender hatred or prejudice. The event is held in November to honor Rita Hester, whose murder on November 28th, 1998 kicked off the “Remembering Our Dead” web project and a San Francisco candlelight vigil in 1999. Rita Hester’s murder — like most anti-transgender murder cases — has yet to be solved.
  3. Trending hashtag on twitter in response to Brazilian Judges decision

 

Please follow and like us:
0

Auschwitz’s-The Pink Triangle-Never Forget

By Sabrina Samone

I’ve been labeled by some as a nerd and well, I agree. In fact, I’m fabulously in love with being a nerd. Some of my nerd trips are history and geography. How I love history. One thing I’ve noticed about history is that if you are hearing the news 300 years later its relevance is obviously not as strong. How did the Egyptians feel that day the Great Pyramid was complete? How was it to look at the Sphinx in it’s day. I’m sure it’s a lot grander than reading about it 3000 years later, but the beautiful fact remains…we are still reading about it.

What will it be like in 2945 when they acknowledge Auschwitz a thousand years from now? Hopefully they will remember it being one, if not the most disgustingly, horrible display of the depths of evil human beings were capable of. Hopefully they will remember the Pink Triangle.

Auschwitz was a network of German Nazi concentration camps and extermination camps built and operated by the Third Reich in Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany during World War II. The concentration and extermination camps would be where countless torturous medical experiments would take place along with the hellish torture of millions of Jewish and TBLG people. Some of the experiments ranged from experiments on twins, bone, muscle and nerve transplanting, head injury experiments; and freezing experiments with the intent of discovering means to prevent and treat hypothermia. There were 360 to 400 experiments and 280 to 300 victims indicating some victims suffered more than one experiment. One study forced subjects to endure a tank of ice water for up to five hours.

When the war was over World leaders met in France to what is called the “Paris Peace Treaties”. Never again would the world stand by and permit genocide like the Nazi regime’s extermination of six million Jews during World War II. This also led to the creation of NATO.

In 2015, on January 10th the Tel Aviv-Jaffa municipality unveiled a monument to commemorate members of the TGLG community who were persecuted by the Nazi regime for their sexual orientation and gender identity.

Why is it important to remember? Today, nations like Russia, Uganda, and now Kazakhstan, among other small nations have adopted anti-lgbt laws that have spread hate, caused harm, and shown remarkable resemblance to the type of laws Hitler began issuing regarding the Jewish people shortly before World War II. Nazi anti-Jewish policy began functioning on two primary levels: legal measures to expel the Jews from society and strip them of their rights and property, while simultaneously engaging in campaigns of incitement, abuse, terror, and violence of varying proportions. There was one goal: to make the Jews leave Germany. On March 9, 1933, several weeks after Hitler assumed power, organized attacks on Jews broke out across Germany. Two weeks later, the Dachau concentration camp, situated near Munich opened. In the current case of Uganda, Russia, and Kazakhstan’s current anti TBLG laws the only difference is the establishment thus far, as far as we know,  of concentration camps.

The world, NATO, and those nations that signed the Paris Peace Treaties should be appalled, but nothing is being done. They sit quietly just as they did when Hitler slowly came to power and began his rage. It wasn’t until January 27, 1945 that the entire world stood horrified at what had taken place.

Would have been worn by someone who classified themselves or were falsely accused of being Gay, Bi, or Transgender
  • The Nazi’s used a system of classifying their tortured human experiments:
    Single triangles 
  • Red triangle—political prisoners: social democrats, socialists, trade unionists, Freemasons, communists, and anarchists.
  • Green triangle— “professional criminals” (convicts, often working in the camps as Kapos).
    Blue triangle—foreign forced laborers, emigrants.
  • Purple triangle—primarily Jehovah’s Witnesses (over 99%), and members of other small religious groups.
  • Pink triangle—primarily homosexual men, as well as sexual offenders including rapists, paedophiles and zoophiles.
  • Black triangle—people who were deemed “asocial elements” (asozial) and “work shy” (arbeitsscheu) including
    • Roma (Gypsies), later assigned a brown triangle.
    • The mentally ill
    • Alcoholics
    • Vagrants and beggars
    • Pacifists
    • Conscription resisters
    • Prostitutes
    • Drug addicts

  • Brown triangleRoma (Gypsies), primarily men. Previously wore the black triangle with a “Z” notation (for Zigeuner > “Gypsy”) to the right of the triangle’s point.
    Uninverted red triangle — an enemy POW (Sonderhäftling – “Special Detainee”), German spy or traitor (Aktionshäftling – “Activities Detainee”), or a military deserter or criminal (Wehrmacht Angehöriger – “Service Member”).
  • Double triangles
    Double-triangle badges resembled two superimposed triangles forming a Star of David, a Jewish symbol.
    Two superimposed yellow triangles or a six-pointed star, the “Yellow badge”— a Jew. The word Jude (“Jew”) was often inscribed in faux-Hebrew-looking letters inside the center of the badge.
    P Letter “P” on a red triangle for Polish Christian Political Enemy (first in Auschwitz)
  • Red inverted triangle superimposed upon a yellow one—a Jewish political prisoner
  • Green inverted triangle upon a yellow one—a Jewish “habitual criminal”
  • Purple inverted triangle superimposed upon a yellow one—a Jehovah’s Witness of Jewish descent
  • Pink inverted triangle superimposed upon a yellow one—a Jewish “sexual offender”
  • Black inverted triangle superimposed upon a yellow one—”asocial” and “work shy” Jews
  • Voided black inverted triangle superimposed over a yellow triangle—a Jew convicted of miscegenation and labelled as a Rassenschänder (“race defiler”).
  • Yellow inverted triangle superimposed over a black triangle—an Aryan (woman) convicted of miscegenation and labelled as a Rassenschänder (“race defiler”).

The attack on Germany’s gay community began in 1933 when the Prussian Ministry of the Interior adopted a radically conservative social policy and authorized “Operation Clean Reich.” As a result of the ministry’s new orders, the gay bars and clubs that had been so plentiful around the turn of the century were closed or destroyed. Around the same time, gay prostitutes were detained and held in “protective custody” throughout Germany by the regime’s paramilitary forces.

We may assume the recent anti TBLG laws will eventually work themselves out, or someone will rise and take care of them but eastern Europe has proven within one lifetime (only 70 years ago), that they are willing and capable of eradicating an entire group of people.

Before World War ll there were no documented sex change operations, but it is safe to assume that many of the “thought to be” gay, effeminate men, and butch women were early transgender.

Transgender SRS history that can be traced back to World War ll


Magnus Hirschfield was an early German physician and sexologist. He is considered the first outspoken LGBT activist. He was associated with the Institut für Sexualwissenschaft, where they were studying the way to change sex, until it was closed down by the Nazi Party. It was Magnus Hirschfeld who coined the term transexualism, identifying the clinical category which his colleague Harry Benjamin would later develop in the United States and a standard by which all transitioning transgender persons follow to this day.

We owe it not only to ourselves to remember for the sake of the future Trans culture, but we also as humans owe it to ourselves to remember the Pink Triangle so that no nation disregards human life as did the Nazi’s.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO DISCUSS THIS OR ANY OTHER TOPIC ON OUR SITE, PLEASE JOIN THE CONVERSATION ON  THE TMP FORUM

The Novel The Pink Triangle on Amazon

  1. Originally published as part of a series on the rise of fascism two years ago on our blog, Transmuseplaent.blogspot.com:

A)  Are we witnesses to the beginning Genocide of the LGBT in Russia and Uganda? 

B) Uganda and Transgender Rights…it’s time!

C) Auschwitz’s TBGL : Never Forget The Pink Triangle 

Please follow and like us:
0

A Study about Racism in the LGBTQ Community Strikes Out on the Reality of Race

Recently  Editor of TMPlanet Micah J. Fleck, examined the effects of adding two additional colors to the rainbow flag. The additions were created to better represent all the diversity within the LGBTQ community. Outrage has poured out in white, LGB elite circles since the June 13th revealing of the new design in Philadelphia . In The Curious Case of the Philadelphia Pride Flag, Fleck called out the hypocrisy of LGBT pride leaders across the country, who have expressed outrage of an inclusive symbol, actually becoming all inclusive.

Several South Carolina gay white activist, were quick to deny  that racism is even a problem. Maybe they themselves have not experienced this – privilege often blinds people to the struggles of others. Just because they haven’t had these experiences, that doesn’t mean that the problem doesn’t exist. Their obsessive need for a particular color arrangement is not more important than the message of inclusion.

Now those elite men behind the “Gay Agenda”, have dug even deeper in the sand. On July 7, the Washington Post published, “Yes, there’s racism in the LGBT community. But there’s more outside of it.” Andrew Flores, assistant professor at Mills College, examined the 2016 Cooperative Congressional Election Survey (CCES), which included questions addressing the respondent’s sexual orientation and gender identity. The CCES is a large survey comprised of 64,600 interviews. The 2016 survey included 4,946 individuals who self-identified as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, and/or transgender—making up 8.8 percent of the weighted sample.

Flores compared LGBT people of color and white LGBT people to cisgender heterosexual people, both of color and white. He concluded, “on the whole, LGBT people—both those who are white and people of color—are more progressive in their racial attitudes than their cisgender heterosexual counterparts.”
However, there are many problems with the resulting analysis, the biggest being that it isn’t rooted in the real world framework of how LGBT people of color experience racism. Instead, the survey, and thus the author’s extrapolation of its results, are based on three overly simplistic statements: “I am angry that racism exists,” “white people have certain advantages based solely on the color of their skin,” and “racial problems in the U.S. are rare, isolated situations.”

Flores notes that the greatest differences in racial attitudes can be seen in the acknowledgment of white privilege. About 70 percent of cisgender heterosexual people of color, 70 percent of LGBT white people, and 77 percent of LGBT people of color agree that “White people have certain advantages because of the color of their skin,” compared with about 41 percent of cisgender heterosexual white people. In the survey, Flores notes, “white gay, bisexual, and transgender men are just as racially aware as those of color, and similar patterns exist between LGBT white women and women of color.”

But while white privilege is easy enough to acknowledge, that doesn’t necessarily mean white folks are doing much to counter it. We know people of color and white people within the LGBT community have varied reactions to racism, and they are rarely the same or similar.

Now, more than ever, we need more actionable, not attitudinal, responses. We need analyses that center the voices of LGBT people of color rather than white people who have never experienced the nuanced ways that racism expresses itself, often in the form of everyday micro-aggressions.

As a community, we can do so much more. For example; on any given major social media page,  or group for transgender people, not to even mention the greater LGBT forums, there’s limited representation of trans people of color. There are several reasons as to why. One, and the biggest reason is the media. The media still sees our stories as less important, less attractive; unless there’s an horrific tragedy. Second, and still related to the media’s decisions, is our own as a community. Why does the media choose not to represent more people of color? It has a lot to do with what we do as  community, with that information given. More often than not, it is ignored and over looked. If we can only say occasionally, that we are concerned about trans people of color, but  unable to actually show that interest and concern, we contribute to the media’s under representation of trans people of color. We can and we must do more to unite our shared struggles as trans people, to lift up our entire demographic.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO DISCUSS THIS OR ANY OTHER TOPIC ON OUR SITE, PLEASE JOIN THE CONVERSATION ON  THE TMP FORUM

 

Please follow and like us:
0