Top Countries That are Stronger & Better with Transgender Military Service Members

By TMPlanet

Recent U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) policy banned transgender personnel from serving openly in the military. Potential changes to this policy raised questions regarding access to gender transition–related health care. It examined the costs of covering transition-related treatments, assessed the potential readiness implications of a policy change, and reviewed the experiences of foreign militaries that permit transgender personnel to serve openly. RAND, has consistently stated: 

  • Using private health insurance claims data to estimate the cost of extending gender transition–related health care coverage to transgender personnel indicated that active-component health care costs would increase by between $2.4 million and $8.4 million annually, representing a 0.04- to 0.13-percent increase in active-component health care expenditures.
  • Even upper-bound estimates indicate that less than 0.1 percent of the total force would seek transition-related care that could disrupt their ability to deploy.

While the US, maybe considered the most strongest free nation on Earth, these nations are proving they have strengthen their military more, while having transgender inclusion in their armed forces. While there are more nations, the US wants to join by banning transgender services, there is an estimated 20 leading nations with no such ban. Several like the U.K., Australia, Thailand, Austria, Belgium come with restrictions, limited pay of  health care, or limit trans people to administrative duties only, as in the case with Thailand. Below are the top nations for complete inclusion of trans military, with UK as the least amongst them. 

The  Netherlands

Netherlands became the first to allow transgender people in the military only a few years after the Stonewall riots, in 1974. The Dutch military was the first to go on record not only permitting Trans troops in 1974, but encouraging pride in all LGBT identities. The Netherlands has become the most culturally liberal country in the world, with recent polls indicating that more than 90% of Dutch people support same-sex marriage. Amsterdam has frequently been named one of the most LGBT friendly cities in the world. Although, transgender people are allowed to change their legal gender, discrimination protections on the grounds of gender identity or expression have not been explicitly enacted countrywide yet. The Dutch parliament enacted the Equal Rights Act in 1994, which bans discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation in employment, housing, and both public and private accommodations. Transgender people are protected under the category ‘gender’. Although gender identity is not specifically mentioned, there have been cases where the Dutch Institute for Human Rights has ruled that transgender people fall under this clause. However, in 2014 the Ministry of BZK started exploring how the ban on discrimination based on gender identity and gender expression can be made explicit in the Equal Rights Act. The results were published on June 23, 2016.¹

Sweden

Keeping up with its Nordic neighbors, Sweden has extended full protection from discrimination to all LGBT people in its military ranks since a legislative reform in 2008. LGBT rights in Sweden have been regarded as some of the most progressive in Europe and in the world. Sweden became the first country in the world to allow transgender people  to change their legal gender post-sex reassignment surgery in 1972. Being transgender was declassified as a mental illness in 2008, and legislation allowing gender change legally without hormone replacement therapy and sex reassignment surgery was passed in 2013. The Swedish Armed Forces states that it actively work for an environment where individuals do not feel it to be necessary to hide their sexual orientation or gender identity. In 2015, they launched a Pride campaign featuring a soldier in uniform with the rainbow flag badget to her arm. The text’s bold letters translates to “Some things you should not have to camouflage,” followed by the text “Equality is an important ingredient in a democracy.” “In the military, we treat each other with respect and see our differences as a strength. We are an inclusive organisation where all who serve and contribute should feel welcomed and respected”²

Israel

The Israel Defense Forces have knowingly included transgender soldiers since 1998³. In 2014, the Israeli military said it had at least five transgender members and would support future such conscripts. Israel’s national healthcare plan provides stipends to citizens who are transitioning. Retired Gen. Elazar Stern was stupefied when a reporter from Israel Army Radio called Wednesday to ask for his reaction to President Trump’s series of tweets about banning the service of transgender military personnel. “It makes us strong that we don’t waste time on questions like this,” said Stern, the former commander of the Israel Defense Forces Manpower Command. “It’s something to be proud of.”  Stern, now a member of Israel’s parliament for the centrist Yesh Atid party, said that throughout his 34-year career in the army,

“in every post, at every level, always, I knew there were homosexual individuals serving with me. No transgender people that I knew of, but maybe. We would never ask, honestly, and we’re not supposed to know. The army’s task is to support its soldiers no matter what their needs, not meddle about in their lives.”

Adi Anhang, Israeli Armed Forces Veteran

Friend of TMP, and Israeli Armed Forces Veteran Adi Anhang, told TMPlanet about the atmosphere in Israel. “I feel like we are taking positive strides regarding the way the country treats the trans community. The fact that our army allows for people to not only serve in a division that suits their gender identity, but also that the army actively helps and protects trans soldiers. I think it’s amazing and shows that we are doing something right. Obviously there are issues with biggots and close minded people, but as an organization the army is pretty supportive,” said Adi Anhang

Canada

 Our neighbor to the north took to Twitter to contrast its military gender identity policies with President Trump’s ad hoc ban on transgender service: According to the CBC, Canada’s chief broadcast news service, 19 Canadian service members “completed sex reassignment surgery between 2008 and 2015 for a total cost of $319,000” — about 25% less than a helmet for a single F-35 pilot costs the U.S. military.

“We welcome Cdns of all sexual orientations and gender identities. Join us!” it reads, with a photograph of Royal Canadian Navy Band members playing instruments festooned in Pride colours.

Jordan Owens, spokesperson for Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan, said the government is fully committed to building a defense team that “reflects Canadian ideals of diversity, respect and inclusion.”Our diversity strategy and action plan will promote an institution-wide culture that embraces diversity and inclusion, and we will continue to focus on the recruitment and retention of under-represented groups within the Canadian Forces’ ranks,” she said in a statement to CBC News.That’s in sharp contrast to the U.S. president’s new policy, announced through a series of Twitter posts Wednesday, which says transgender individuals will not be permitted to serve “in any capacity.”

Czech Republic

The Czech Republic extended full military service rights to all LGBT people in 1999. The first sex reassignment surgery in the country took place in 1942, when a trans man subsequently changed his legal sex to male. Currently, 50-60 people undergo such surgeries annually in the country.   ECRI notes that there is no³ official data on the LGBT population in the country, although the authorities carried out an in-depth Analysis of the Situation of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and
Transgender Minority in the Czech Republic in 2007. Research demonstrates that in general there is broad tolerance for LGBT persons in the country. In a global survey published in June 2013, the Czech Republic had the third highest percentage in Europe (80%, after Spain and Germany) and worldwide (on a par with Canada) of people agreeing that “society should accept homosexuality”.

Argentina 

Cristina Fernandez de Kirschner, signed into law the country’s gender identity bill, establishing Argentina as the most trans-friendly legal environment in the entire world. Under the new law, trans people will be able to change their legal gender and name without judicial permission or any requirement that they undergo surgeries. Further, once these changes are made, trans people will have access to the country’s socialized medical system for all their transition-related care for free including any desired surgeries. People will be able to legally change their IDs started on June 4. Argentina’s new trans protections only add to a list of LGBT friendly policies the country has passed, including marriage equality, adoption by same-sex couples, open military service and nondiscrimination policies. After a sordid 20th century history of repression, military rule, and brief war with the U.K., Argentine forces are primarily used for humanitarian assistance and peacekeeping now.4

Germany

The rising leader in continental and trans-Atlantic politics has liberalized its military in stages since the fall of communism. LGBT people were first allowed to enlist in 1990, and were first allowed to pursue commissions in 2000, according to the CBC. Discrimination protections on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity vary across Germany, but discrimination in employment and the provision of goods and services is in principle banned countrywide. Transgender people have been allowed to change their legal gender since 1980. The law initially required them to undergo surgical alteration of their genitals in order to have key identity documents changed. This has since been declared unconstitutional.

SPAIN

Transgender people are allowed to change their legal gender without the need of sex reassignment surgery or sterilization. Discrimination regarding sexual orientation and gender identity and expression has been banned nationwide since 1996. In November 2006, Zapatero’s Government passed a law that allows transgender persons to register under their preferred sex in public documents such as birth certificates, identity cards and passports without undergoing prior surgical change.The law came into effect on 17 March 2007.  Through this Law, ratified by the Congress of Deputies on March 1, Spain has a specific legislation that provides coverage and legal certainty to the need for these people, who have an adequate diagnosis, to correct the registry allocation of their Sex that is contradictory to their identity. In short, it will prevent these people from having a discordant name with the sex they feel.5

Bolivia

While the small South American nation wasn’t considered progressive on gay and trans rights until very recently, it opened the armed forces’ ranks to LGBT people in 2015.  Article 14(II) of the Constitution of Bolivia forbids discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. In 2010, the government criminalized discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity under article 23 of the Law Against Racism and All Forms of Discrimination (Law 737/2010). In 2016, Bolivia passed the Gender Identity Law, seen as one of the most progressive laws related to transgender people in the world. Additionally, since 2017, transgender people have been able to marry people of the same biological sex. The Gender Identity Law allows individuals over 18 to legally change their name, gender and photography on legal documents. A psychological test proving that the person knows and voluntarily assumes the change of identity is a requirement, but sex reassignment surgery is not. The process is confidential and must carry out before the Civil Registry Service. The processing of the new documentation will take 15 days. The change of name and gender will be reversible once, after which they cannot modify these data again. Since October 2016, the Bolivian Congress has debated whether to repeal the Gender Identity Law. In June 2017, the Supreme Electoral Tribunal issued an instruction in which it notified the Civil Registry Service to proceed with the registration of marriages of transgender people. The instruction states that transgender people who have made the changes regulated by the Gender Identity Law may enter into civil marriage. This means that same-sex marriage is legal in Bolivia, but only if at least one of the two partners is transgender.

United Kingdom

The main commander of Britain’s combat ground forces, Lt. Gen. Patrick Sanders, has personally taken up the fight to ensure full rights of LGBT soldiers in the service. Currently, the UK expects transgender enlistees to “have have finished transitioning before they are allowed to serve,” according to HCSS. Sanders — a veteran of Iraq, Afghanistan, Northern Ireland, and the Balkan conflict — has said that “only if individuals are free to be themselves can we release the genie of their potential, for the greater good.”

That said, the British military has more or less avoided the debate over paying for troops’ gender reassignment surgeries. U.K. law requires citizens to live two years in their “acquired gender” before being eligible for official recognition and enlistment.

 

As we said in the beginning, there are several leading nations, but with restrictions. Yet their efforts in inclusion also needs recognition and here is that list.

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  1. The Netherlands Equal Rights Act, that is set a total ban on discrimination based on gender identity and gender expression.
  2. Sweden’s Armed Forces launched a Pride campaign in 2015, calling on its LGBT service members to be free and serve openly. Their slogan: Swedish Army: “Some things you should not have to camouflage”
  3. Analysis of the Situation of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Minority in the Czech Republic in 2007
  4.  Human Rights Watch: In 2012, the Gender Identity Law established the right of individuals over the age of 18 to choose their gender identity, undergo gender reassignment, and revise official documents without any prior judicial or medical approval.
  5. The Gender Identity Act enters into force (Entra en vigor la Ley de Identidad de Género)
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Sergeant Elaina Odom: Sacrifice…Duty….Honor…In the Face of Hate

By Sabrina Samone

Imagine when given a choice between a life of crime and addiction, you had the mental “worthiness” to choose a path that would better yourself, to be an asset to your family, and to defend your country. You would’ve easily chose to be a “burden”¹ on society, to your family, and a drain on your country, but you didn’t. Elaina Odom made the decision to be of service to those she loved, and her country. To save her life from a dangerous path. Eleven years, she dedicated her life to service of country. Climbing the military ranks to become Sargent Odom. Not everyone is cut out for the military, let alone to do more than a few years. Lifers, are dedicated, determined, with a humble passion for serving their nation.

Now imagine, eleven years that included combats in Afghanistan, sacrificing precious time away from your three new beautiful children, for long periods of time. After another deployment to Korea, you come home eager to be with your family, and families unknown that you have risked your life to protect. While you cradle your youngest, make Churros, and put on ‘Book of Life’, so they can calm down; you hear that your Commander and Chief has made yet another early morning tweet. This time it’s to inform you that he does not support you, or even wish for your service.

President Donald Trump announced he was banning transgender people from serving in the military in a series of tweets Wednesday, July 26, 2017. (Images via Twitter)

On Wednesday 26, 2017, wrongfully elected Donald J. Trump sent out a tweet that transgender people were not worthy, and a burden to the US military. The summer of 2016, with the help of Former President Barack Obama, the ban was lifted for transgender people to serve openly. Earlier this year, under the new Republican Administration, debate arose in regards to US spending on trans related health care. Many experts have noted that the average cost would be between 2.4 and 8.4 million dollars annually², which is relatively low compared to various other treatments, including elective cosmetics treatments that are covered.

If you are unable to place yourself in those shoes and feel the pride of someone providing a safe comfortable life for their family. A person that’s proud of the work they do for their country. Then meet Sergeant Elaina Odom, because that imaginary scenario is her painfully real story.

TMP: Elaina, as a Transgender American, and active service member, how did it make you feel to hear about the tweets from your Commander and Chief?

Elaina Odom: Honestly? When I first heard about it, I felt like I had been hit in the gut. Seeing those tweets, and getting so many messages from others concerned about it really bothered me. Here we have been fighting for equal treatment, and this happens in attempt to just so easily dismiss us.

TMP: In his Tweets, Trump stated that he had consulted with Generals, and other leaders in the military. He also stated that having trans people in the military would result in additional cost to taxpayers. His entire tweets have since been proven false, and outright lies. But how does that affect the morale of the average military personnel risking their life for that very office to exist?

E. O: I can’t speak for others, but I know that he has had a running track record with not telling the truth in order to further his ideas. As for myself, I was hit with this feeling of loss and hopelessness. What would I do, what could I do? That was the feeling for a lot of other people I talked to as well.

TMP: Being on the front line of this fight, as well as the freedom of our country, what’s your opinion on the treatment for health care of Transgender personnel, which based on a recent report by ABC News, confirms a yearly annual cost for trans related health care of about 8.4M, and how would that compare to the millions more being spent on Viagra to treat male impotence?

E.O.: I can’t say they are doing a perfect job as many health care providers are still learning to treat trans soldiers. From the experiences I have had personally though, they have always been open and willing to work with us. As far as treating impotence outweighing the cost of our care, it really is a numbers game. ED is more common than trans care, and that explains why there is such a deep difference in cost.

TMP: How worried are you about your future in the Military?

E.O.: I have had some concerns that this will end my career after being in as long as I have. But at the same time it presented me with the opportunity to really look at things, and see what I was missing in my plans to provide for myself and my family, should we be discharged.

TMP: When did you first decided that military service was for you?

E.O.: I first thought about joining the military around sixteen, seventeen years old. I was in a bad spot selling drugs, stealing, and things like that. I was not in a good place, and needed to change. The Army offered that opportunity.

TMP: What has having your dreams of being in the military meant to you, and what it could mean to others that want to serve?

E.O.: Truthfully, I never dreamed of joining the military. I joined to get away from a life that would have ended up getting me locked away, or killed. It was a way to survive, and eventually better myself through their offering of education. It meant a roof over my head, food in my stomach, and so much more without the things I was doing.

TMP: You’re a Sergeant, yes? What were the obstacles you faced physically, and mentally to get to that position?

E.O.: I am, yes. Getting promoted to that rank for the longest time seemed impossible as their were so many in my job. They promote on a points based system, and for us we were maxed out on the scale for a good five years almost. I knew I would have a hard time getting all of the points needed, and over time eventually gave up all together. Then one day, I was told hey, you made cut off, you are getting promoted.

TMP: How exciting for you, that’s awesome. Have you been involved in any combats?

E.O.: I served a year in Afghanistan. It was rough being away from my family, as it always seems to be. But it came with the job, I signed on to fight and win our nation’s wars, even if that meant being gone for a year at a time.

TMP: Despite the bigotry we’ve faced this week from the leaders of this free nation, what advice would you give to other transgender military personnel, or those that wish to serve their country one day?

E.O.: Keep your head up, we have a hard road ahead of us, just like before. But progress does not happen without a struggle. We will get where we need to be in time.

 

TMP: I  like to ask my guest here at TMP, that if you could tell the world something unique about Sgt. Elaina Odom³, and you knew everyone would hear, what would you like them to know about you?

E.O.: I honestly don’t know. I have been told I have a knack at being sarcastic to the point that people really can’t tell, but that is about it I think.

Elaina Odom, is one of an estimated 15,500 transgender military members, that would share similar stories this week. A struggle that’s been a battle for decades, with fears of receiving a dishonorable discharge. Military families that are forced to look into each other’s eyes with no other explanation than that of the bigotry of the very country you defended with your life.

We can debate, and recently a study showed that 58% of Americans are in favor of transgender people serving. Yet, let us not forget what is really at stake. We are on the progress to full inclusion into the military, and I fundamentally believe a tweet cannot alter that ship from sailing. What is at stake is the credibility of our democracy. These tweets were no more than a mere distraction from the recent hearings on Russian hacking of an American election. It is really revealing of Trump, that not only was our very democracy’s soul put up for sale, but now the blood of the men, women, and non-binary people who have died for the very existence of this country since it’s conception. 

John F. Kennedy once said, “I can imagine no more rewarding a career. And any man who may be asked in this century what he did to make his life worthwhile, I think can respond with a good deal of pride and satisfaction: ‘I served in the United States Navy.”

Regardless of what branch, it is a sacrifice. A sacrifice of family, health, and even your life. It’s not a decision many go into lightly, therefore it’s our duty as a nation, as a government, and the duty of the President of the United States to stand by all people who are willing to make that sacrifice for country. Anything less is the true abomination.

 

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  1. The military’s Commander and Chief referred to trans military personnel as a burden, and are unworthy. A UCLA study estimates that 15,500 transgender service members to be enlisted on active duty, in the reserves, and in the National Guard. That same study estimated 134,300 transgender people are veterans or retired from the armed forces.
  2. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine states; Providing transition-related care to the 188 military personnel expected to require it annually would cost an estimated $5.6 million per year, or $438 per transgender service member per year, or 22 cents per member per month. If the Australian military’s annual cost of transition-related care were applied to the U.S. armed forces, the Pentagon could expect to pay $4.2 million per year to provide such care.
  3. Sgt. Elaina Odom lives in Texas when not defending her country, a state that has passed bathroom bills punishing transgender people for using the rest room not in accordance to their birth certificate, when she received the news of Trump’s tweets.
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19 Attorneys General Seek Military Transgender Protections

By TMPlanet

(AP) ¹ The top legal officers in 18 states and the District of Columbia have asked Congress to pass legislation prohibiting discrimination against transgender service members.

Hawaii Attorney General Douglas Chin sent the letter dated Thursday in response to President Donald Trump’s announcement, via Twitter a day earlier, that he would ban transgender people in the military.

The letter asks the chairmen and ranking members of the House and Senate Armed Services committees to reaffirm in legislation that transgender people may not be banned from serving in the military. It urges lawmakers to include transgender protections in the National Defense Authorization Act. Eighteen other attorneys general, who like Chin are all Democrats, also signed the document. The president’s position would put in place a policy that “violates fundamental constitutional and American values,” the attorneys general said.

“The new ban harms our states’ transgender residents and marginalizes an entire group of people based solely on gender identity,” the letter said.

On Thursday, Gen. Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said U.S. policy on transgender individuals serving in uniform hasn’t and won’t change until Defense Secretary Jim Mattis receives the president’s policy direction and Mattis determines how to implement it.

The Pentagon hasn’t released data on the number of transgender people currently serving, but a Rand Corp. study has estimated between 1,320 and 6,630, out of 1.3 million active-duty troops.

Attorneys general from the following joined Hawaii in signing the letter: California, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia and Washington.

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  1. © Copyright 2017 The Associated Press.
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58% of Americans Support Transgender Military Service

By TMPlanet

According to a recent poll by Reuters ¹;  A majority of Americans believe that transgender individuals should be allowed to serve in the military.

The  poll conducted between July 26-28 suggested that the country largely disagrees with Donald Trump’s announcement this week², that he will ban transgender personnel from the armed forces.

When asked to weigh in on the debate, 58 percent of adults agreed with the statement,

“Transgender people should be allowed to serve in the military³.” Twenty-seven percent said they should not while the rest answered “don’t know.”

Democrats mostly supported military service by transgender Americans while Republicans were divided on the issue.

Among Republicans, 32 percent said transgender people should be allowed to serve, while 49 percent said they should not. Another 19 percent of Republicans said they don’t know.

Poll Conducted by Rueters

The public was also divided over the impact of banning transgender service members. Some 32 percent said it would “hurt morale” in the military while 17 percent said it would “improve morale.” Another 33 percent felt it would “have no impact” and the rest said they don’t know.

When asked about the impact on military capabilities, 14 percent said prohibiting transgender service members made the military “more capable” while 43 percent said “no impact,” 22 percent said “less capable” and the rest said they don’t know.

The president’s announcement, made in posts on his Twitter account, surprised many senior military officers and appeared to pre-empt an ongoing Pentagon review into its inclusion of transgender service members.

The United States’ top military officer, Marine Corps General Joseph Dunford, said the military will not alter its current policies until it receives additional guidance from Trump’s secretary of defense.

Roger Kaikko, 61, a Trump voter near Cleveland, Ohio, who took the poll, said he disagrees with the president.

“Even the president shouldn’t be able to take rights away from some people just because he may not like them,” Kaikko said. “They’re people too. Unless they’re causing problems, they should serve just like anybody else.”

Opinions about the ban probably will not have lasting impact on the president’s believe anything, devout followers.

Jan Leighley, an expert in political behavior at American University said, “For many people, this is just a distant political issue. When compared to healthcare, immigration or the economy, the president’s stance on transgender issues “is not something that’s going to change their prior beliefs or attitudes” about Trump.

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  1.  The Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll was conducted online in English across the United States. It gathered responses from 1,249 adults including 533 Democrats and 434 Republicans. It has a credibility interval, a measure of accuracy, of 3 percentage points for the entire group and 5 percentage points for Democrats and Republicans.
  2. #Notmypresident,

    President Donald Trump announced he was banning transgender people from serving in the military in a series of tweets Wednesday, July 26, 2017. (Images via Twitter)
  3. A 2014 study estimated that 15,500 trans people were currently serving in the U.S. military. The Williams Institute, a think tank at UCLA School of Law that researches gender identity, came to that figure using a 2011 survey of 6,546 transgender Americans. Around 20 percent of that survey’s respondents said they had served in the armed forces. There are currently 1.3 million active-duty personnel in the U.S. military and an additional 800,000 in reserves.
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Republicans Fail 214-209…This Time

It’s a hurtful amendment, it’s not needed. I view it as a personal issue, because as a mom I’m impacted, but it’s an issue of fairness for everyone. ” said Miami Republican Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, a Miami Republican.

The House of Representatives debated banning medical treatments for transgender individuals serving in the military. Republican Rep. Hunter of California suggested to any transgender person willing to defend their country to, “Choose what gender you are before you join.”

Majority of Democrats who gathered to oppose the amendment offered by Republican, Rep. Vicky Hartzler of Mo¹., quietly gasped at the transpobic rhetoric on the House floor.

After Hunter finished speaking, Sean Patrick Maloney, an openly gay congressman from New York, took his turn at the podium.

No one in the Pentagon has called for this,” Maloney said. “The Hartzler amendment would single out and rob a small group of military service members and their families of their health care merely because these folks, or members of their family, experience gender a little differently.”

Just under an hour later, the House of Representatives narrowly voted down Hartzler’s proposal 214-209, to audible cheers from the House floor.

More than two dozen House Republicans voted with 190 Democrats to sink the amendment that would prohibit military funds for soldiers seeking medical treatment related to gender transition.

It’s a hurtful amendment, it’s not needed,” said Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen², a Miami Republican, and a noted advocate for LGBT rights who has a transgender son. “I view it as a personal issue, because as a mom I’m impacted, but it’s an issue of fairness for everyone. You don’t have to know someone that’s transgender or have someone in your immediate family to feel this impact. It’s just needlessly hurtful and serves no useful purpose.

Rep., Ros-Lehtinen was among the 24 other Republicans, including Miami Rep. Carlos Curbelo, who also voted against the amendment. Miami Republican Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart however did vote in favor of the amendment.

Hartzler believes that her amendment would save the military money, and said the Department of Defense could buy 13 more F-35 fighter jets with the money that would be used for gender reassignment surgeries and hormone treatments for transgender service members. Her words sends a dangerous message to trans people and the rest of the country, that most Republicans feel the healthy life of Transgender Americans is worth less than having another Jet.

By recruiting and allowing transgender individuals to serve in OUR military we are subjecting taxpayers to high medical costs including up to $130,000 per transition surgery, lifetime hormone treatments, and additional surgeries to address the high percentage of individuals who experience complications,” she said in a statement. “This policy is costly and a threat to our readiness.”

Republicans and Democrats hammered out the massive $696 billion Department of Defense budget proposal. Leaders from both parties came to an agreement: The annual must-pass bill wasn’t the place for Hartzler’s contentious proposal.

But Hartzler  persisted, and her amendment was accepted late Wednesday evening by House Republicans who determine the rules for debating legislation.

My amendment ends the 2016 Obama Administration practice of the military paying for very expensive gender change surgeries that even most private insurance plans don’t cover,” Hartzler said in a statement. “This amendment does not prevent anyone from joining the military or resources are allocated in a way that is smart and good for our national defense.”

Transgender people were supposed to be allowed to enlist on July 1 this year³, but the day before the deadline Defense Secretary Jim Mattis deferred the decision for another 6 months. Military leaders need more time to analyze whether the “readiness and lethality of our forces” will be affected, he said.

The amendment was immediately blasted by military LGBT groups, who said it was “CRUEL” to deny such health benefits to Americans serving in the military.

“To be clear, this vile amendment is a vicious attack on service members who are sacrificing so much and putting their lives on the line for our country,” said Ashley Broadway-Mach, president of the American Military Partner Association. She said the amendment would also strip “medically necessary” care from transgender family members.

This is vitally important care that military families are already receiving, and these medical decisions should be left to medical professionals and their patients,” she said. “This legislative assault on military families absolutely must be stopped.”

Matt Thorn, the executive director of military LGBT advocacy group Outserve-SLDN, called the amendment “a mean-spirited, unconstitutional attempt to impede the recruitment of openly transgender individuals.”

LGBT groups also condemned Hartzler for calling transgender service members a “DOMESTIC THREAT” in an interview with the conservative Family Research Council.

At a time when we should be focusing on the threats from North Korea, Vladimir Putin, and ISIS, we’re having to deal with a threat here at home — a domestic threat — of allowing transgenders… in our service, which is a real problem because it impacts their readiness, and it’s a huge cost for our military,” Hartzler said.

A 2016 analysis by Rand Corp. found that the impact on military readiness would be minimal, since even the highest estimates indicate that less than 0.1 percent of the total force would ever seek transition-related medical care that would hinder their deployment. It also found that the cost of transition-related treatment would be relatively low.

This amendment will go back to an era, but where we going forward,” said Rep. Adam Smith, a Democrat from Washington State. “It wouldn’t just impact transgender people who are serving, it would also impact their children. It’s a social agenda that has no business being in the defense bill.”

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  1. Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-Mo.)  proposed barring access to transition-related care for troops, citing it would save cost for more weapons. She has served as the U.S. Representative for Missouri’s 4th congressional district since 2011. The district comprises a large swath of the western-central part of the state, anchored in Columbia to the eastern and southern Kansas City suburbs, including a small portion of Kansas City itself.
  2. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, is a South Florida Republican, who came out in support of her transgender son in 2014 in a local CBS news cast.
  3. In June 2016, after a push from the Obama Administration, the Pentagon lifted it’s ban on Transgender people serving openly in the US Military. The ban was to take effect July 1st of 2017. After the election of #NotourPresident, deferments by the Department of Defense began to delay the ban.

 

 

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